About Us

(ESIS) Emergency Services Interactive Systems develops real solutions for real people.

The Developers

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Founder & Co-Developer
San Francisco Fire Captain Mark Johnson established Emergency Services Interactive Systems to develop the Fire Scene Simulator, a response to the dire need for affordable software that trains firefighters using first scene simulations. Fire Scene Simulator – Mark’s collaboration with other San Francisco Fire Department Suppression Officers – is the first fire scene simulator for firefighters, and by firefighters.

Fire Scene Simulator 6 (the latest version) helps firefighters develop and practice firefighting tactics by blending the real world with the virtual world. The software is the first computer program to allow users to import photos of local structures within their department’s jurisdiction and add animated fire and smoke to those structures – making the training experience as authentic as possible.

Mark next achieved success when he added the capability of networking the fire simulations. The software allows departments to create fire scenarios that can be used over existing computer networks. The in-firehouse training allows fire companies to stay in service while conducting training in an educational, department policy-driven, non-hazardous environment.

ESIS’s next venture came in 2004 when San Francisco Police Lieutenant Dan Linehan contacted Mark to collaborate on the development of an innovative new software product that would provide a solution to the bottleneck in event planning. Together they developed the Coordinated NIMS Incident Planner, or CNIP, a secure and user-friendly software program to help first responders create Incident Action Plans that can be synchronized with those of other first response agencies participating in a pre-planned or actual event.

Co-Developer
Sergeant Dan Linehan retired from the San Francisco Police Department in 2008 after a distinguished 32-year career, most of which was spent in the Patrol Division. His move into Emergency Management was a natural progression. He was selected to be Special Events Coordinator at Mission Station, one of San Francisco’s busiest districts. During this time he was responsible for the planning of police resources and the coordination of outside support for hundreds of cultural events, parades, and protests.

In 1998, Dan was chosen by Mayor Willie Brown to lead the planning team for the City’s Millennium Celebrations. The Y2K Project utilized the Incident Command System to organize and deploy hundreds of police officers, sheriff deputies, firefighters, public works employees, and traffic control officers. With an estimated crowd of 300,000 to 500,000, the celebration became one of San Francisco largest gatherings. For his achievements, Dan was recognized by the Police Department and the Board of Supervisors, and was presented with a Certificate of Recognition for extraordinary services rendered.

Following the attacks of September 11, 2001, Dan became an original member of the Police Department’s Homeland Security Unit. As lead instructor, he trained his peers on the functions of the National Incident Management System. Through this and his experience planning for the Y2K events, Dan realized that the numerous and repetitive Incident Command forms (required by NIMS) were the greatest obstacles for any law enforcement agency attempting to adopt NIMS. Dan sought out to tackle the problem.

In 2004, Dan contacted Mark Johnson, San Francisco Fire Captain and computer wiz, to collaborate on the development of an innovative new software product that would provide a solution to the burdensome administrative problems associated with ICS forms. The partnership resulted in the Coordinated NIMS Incident Planner, or CNIP, a secure and user-friendly software program to help first responders create Incident Action Plans that can be synchronized with those of other first response agencies participating in a pre-planned or actual event.

Dan and Mark urge all first responders at every level of government to use the Incident Command System for all special events, regardless of size. Doing so affords event planners the opportunity to plan, train, and respond within the NIMS protocols, and, in so doing, ensure an effective and efficient response when a disaster or emergency occurs.

 

Emergency Services Interactive Systems
A brief history...

“The only difference between a problem and a solution is that people understand the solution.”
Charles F. Kettering

Emergency Services Interactive Systems (ESIS), is a software company that develops a wide array of tools to fulfill the needs of Emergency First Responders in the Fire, Law Enforcement, and EMS Fields for both government and private sectors. (ESIS) understands that with the potential risk of a national disaster occurring at any time, it’s imperative that Fire Departments, Law Enforcement Agencies and Emergency Management Teams all stay on the same page. Immediately recognizing this, (ESIS) began designing a series of innovative software applications to alleviate paperwork bottlenecks, improve training, and streamline interoperability.

The first program that (ESIS) created was The Fire Scene Simulator.  Fire Scene Simulator 6 (the latest version) helps firefighters develop and practice firefighting tactics by blending the real world with the virtual world. The software is the first computer program to allow users to import photos of local structures within their department’s jurisdiction. The user can then add animated fire, smoke, and damage to those structures causing the building to react as if it was actually on fire, thus making the training experience as authentic as possible.

(ESIS) next venture came in 2004 when they saw a huge need to develop an innovative new software product that would provide a solution to the bottleneck in event planning, and emergency response. This is when our marquee product, The Coordinated (NIMS) Incident Planner, or (CNIP) was created. (CNIP) is a secure and user-friendly software program that helps first responders create Incident Action Plans. (IAPs), and can then be synchronized with those of other mutual aid and first response agencies who are involved in the disaster or pre-planned event.

(ESIS) strives to constantly stay on the cutting edge of technology when it comes to Emergency Response and Pre-Planning. Just like in sports the best defense is a good offense, which is why (ESIS) has developed these tools to promote a proactive rather than a reactive approach to dealing with events, emergencies, and disasters of any scale.

About (NIMS)
National Incident Management System

The 2001 terrorist attacks and the increasingly violent hurricane seasons highlight the need to focus on improving emergency response capabilities and coordination processes across the country. To address the issue, in 2003, President Bush signed Homeland Security Presidential Directive 5, which mandates the use of the National Incident Management System (NIMS) for all organizations responding to an emergency. The new system is based on California’s Incident Command System, a communications strategy established in the aftermath of devastating wildfires in the 1970s.

(NIMS) is a comprehensive national approach that sets standards to provide a consistent incident management approach for government and private entities at all levels. Its framework forms the basis for interoperability and compatibility that enables a diverse set of public and private organizations to conduct well-integrated and effective emergency response operations.

(NIMS) establishes management structures, organizational processes, terminology, mobilization protocols, and communications compatibility requirements. Its intent is to improve the effectiveness of all emergency management and response personnel involved with a pre-planned or actual emergency, including natural hazards, terrorist activities, and other manmade disasters.

Mutual-aid agreements are also an important part of the (NIMS) structure. Emergencies typically begin and end locally, and are managed on a daily basis at the lowest possible geographical, organizational, and jurisdictional level. However, there are instances in which successful emergency management operations depend on the involvement of multiple jurisdictions, levels of government, emergency responder disciplines, and outside agencies. These occurrences require effective and efficient coordination. (NIMS) establishes the standards that must be adhered to by each responding entity.

(ESIS) developed the Coordinated (NIMS) Incident Planner to help emergency managers comply with the Federal Government’s requirement to adopt the (NIMS) structure, which many view as cumbersome and challenging to implement. (CNIP) is a user-friendly software program that creates Incident Action Plans, a (NIMS) requirement. For the most current updates visit us on Facebook or Follow us on Twitter: